Skip to Content
Texas State University

Newsroom

FEATURED FACULTY

COVID-19 provides fertile breeding ground for conspiracy theories

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, the spread of conspiracy theories about the coronavirus threatens to undermine legitimate efforts to combat the disease and cause lasting harm, warn researchers at Texas State University. 

FEATURED FACULTY

COVID-19 presents obstacles and opportunities for 2020 Census

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS

Clinical laboratory science student screening essential workers for coronavirus in her hometown

FEATURED FACULTY

Symptoms of COVID-19 include fever, fatigue, respiratory distress- and, increasingly, economic anxiety

FEATURED FACULTY

Dr. Rodney E. Rohde lends expertise to national news coverage of COVID-19

FEATURED FACULTY

How students and faculty can prepare to work online

CAMPUS COMMUNITY

Bobcat Bounty adjusts operations to continue serving students

The Future Is Now: "Now we have a scientific basis to estimate large crowd sizes" 

Medium | April 2, 2020

T. Edwin Chow, associate professor in the Department of Geography at Texas State University, investigates the potential of big data, including web demographics and social media, to unearth spatial patterns of human movement in dynamic events, e.g. disaster response, protests, etc.


COVID-19 pandemic proves to be fertile breeding ground for conspiracy theories, TXST finds

News4SA | April 1, 2020

Researchers at Texas State University says that as the COVID-19 pandemic drags on, dangerous conspiracy theories about the virus threaten to undermine legitimate efforts to contain it. At best, the researchers say, conspiracy theories are a distraction. However, such misguided beliefs could lead to a disregard of medical advice or worse.


Central Texas schools and universities donate supplies to help fight COVID-19 pandemic

KXAN | March 29, 2020

Texas State University donated ventilators to local hospitals to help them treat patients with COVID-19.“I talked to the faculty, and we decided if there was a need we could help with, we were open to that,” explained Gregg Marshall, chair of the Department of Respiratory Care. 


Stay Connected

Keep up to date by signing up for our newsletter or follow us on social media.