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Scott Solomon, author of 'Future Humans,' to present lecture, reading

Ayo Olanipekun, Office of Media Relations | October 5, 2018

book cover

SAN MARCOS – Scott Solomon, the author of Future Humans: Inside the Science of Our Continuing Evolution, will give a lecture and book signing at Texas State University on Monday, Oct. 8. 

The lecture will be held at 7 p.m. in the Alkek Teaching Theatre.

Solomon currently teaches ecology, evolutionary biology and scientific communication as an associate teaching professor at Rice University.  His current research examines the interactions between native and non-native ants, the impacts of extreme flooding on ant communities, and the co-evolution between ants and microbes.  His writing and photography have appeared in publications such as Aeon, Nautilus, Slate and Wired and his first book, Future Humans: Inside the Science of Our Continuing Evolution, was published by Yale University Press in 2016.

Solomon earned his doctorate in ecology, evolution and behavior from the University of Texas at Austin, where his research examined the evolutionary basis of biological diversity in the Amazon basin. He has worked as a visiting researcher with the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., and São Paulo State University in Rio Claro, Brazil.

This event is part of the 2018-2019 Common Experience theme on innovation and is presented by the Common Experience Insight Series.

For more information, contact Common Experience director Twister Marquiss at (512) 245-3579 or via email at twister@txstate.edu.

About Texas State University

Founded in 1899, Texas State University is among the largest universities in Texas with an enrollment of 38,694 students on campuses in San Marcos and Round Rock. Texas State’s 188,000-plus alumni are a powerful force in serving the economic workforce needs of Texas and throughout the world. Designated an Emerging Research University by the State of Texas, Texas State is classified under “Doctoral Universities: Higher Research Activity,” the second-highest designation for research institutions under the Carnegie classification system.

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For more information, contact University Communications:

Jayme Blaschke, 512-245-2555

Sandy Pantlik, 512-245-2922